Dr. Mark Holterman: A Portrait of a Medical Renaissance Man

Placing the letters M.D. after the name Mark Holterman doesn’t begin to describe all that he has accomplished. A 1980 graduate he holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in General Biology from Yale.


Dr. Holterman’s MD-PhD in Medicine and immunology was earned at The University of Virginia. A Pediatric Surgeon, he completed his medical residency at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center. He was a fellow of Pediatric Surgery at Seattle Wahington’s Children’s Hospital and Medical Center.


Dr. Mark Holterman the CEO heads up Miriam Global Health. MGH specializes in finding funding for the development of innovative medical techniques. An innovator and researcher himself Dr. Holterman studies regenerative medical (stem cell) therapies.


He has also conducted research to develop new treatments for diabetes. Dr. Holterman’s diabetes research earned him The American Diabetes Association Innovative Research Award.


An educator Dr. Mark Holterman is a professor of pediatrics and surgery at the University of Illinois College of Medicine.


Dr. Holterman’s first philanthropic endeavor was as co-founder of the Hannah Sunshine Foundation. Inspired by his own research, this charity works to benefit chronically ill children by helping them receive regenerative therapies.


More recently, Dr. Mark Holterman’s humanity has prompted his co-founding of the International Pediatric Specialists Alliance for the Children of Vietnam or IPSAC-VN. His connection to Vietnam is through his wife and fellow surgeon Ai-Xuan.


A visit to a children’s hospital in Ho Chi-min City exposed the couple to the desperate need for pediatricians and pediatric treatment facilities in Vietnam. This prompted the Holtermans and the hospital’s chief surgeon’s decision to establish IPSAC-VN.


Through education, the organization works to improve and modernize pediatric care in Vietnam. IPSAC-VN needs both donations and volunteers with special emphasis on the latter. There are some musts for volunteers (OSFHealthcare).


  • A passport that expires at least six months after the end of a volunteer’s service
  • Teaching medical students
  • Seeing patients and performing surgeries
  • Providing their medical license and CV


The types of procedures volunteers perform varies (https://markholterman.wordpress.com/). Some examples are orthopedic and neurological surgeries and organ transplants.